Homework for adult students

Hi,

When I teach languages (mainly Italian) to adults, I often wonder how much time to designate to Homework checking and useful relevant discussion within the lesson. Eg.for another company I teach for, we are all advised to spend approximately a third of the lesson checking Homework (and not to “mark” it without the student being there.) It ends up being a very fruitful time usually and often leads onto discussion about the following week’s homework too, as well as new learning points - so far, the students I have so far worked with have been happy with this structure/method and they’re mostly making good or very good progress.

The only thing that would save us some time in the lesson though I think, is if I could ask my student to email me their homework prior to the lesson so that I could see it first and have a preliminary idea of how they’ve got on in the week, before the lesson begins. When a student is reading out their homework in the lesson, that does have lots of benefits to it (for pronunciation practice etc), however I think that it would help us to economise time better if I could also read it first so that I’ve already got the gist.

Interested in what people’s thoughts and experiences are in any of the above! :slight_smile:

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I don’t teach languages but I’ve been taking a language class online. I always find going through my homework really helpful! It helps me because I can ask questions about anything I didn’t understand. But I usually send the homework after the class started or just before

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Ah thanks for this Julia! So your teacher marks it initially (before you meet for the online lesson) and then you go through it together?

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As a music teacher, it depends on the adult. Practice will always been deemed as the homework and I very rarely set additional homework unless it was really necessary. I am of the opinion that adults (and children alike) have other things in their life to do; parenting/ working, etc. The homework I set them has to be realistic to their life style and therefore will differ from adult to adult. I have one adult who thrives on working under pressure. A few years ago she was required to pass a Music theory exam and we spoke about this in January and the student said she would take the exam at the end of February. I was very sceptical but she got 93/100 in her exam so I’ve learnt not to be cautious when this student chooses a date she wants to do an exam. She also thrives on having a target and so when an exam is part of the process, she practices more often. There are similarities with younger students as they see exams as the aim. I also have another student who is recently retired and especially in lockdown has practiced more than I expected so I have to give him more work. Equally the same can be said for 2 working adults but they just want to learn pieces of music and have no desire to take exams. On the flip side I have retired adults and working adults who don’t practice despite not pressurising them to practice every day but instead 10 minutes every other day and when they felt it was not possible I would suggest specific times or less days.
I think it is individual to the adult whereas in children it is possible to develop that discipline with the support of parents.

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Actually, we mark it during the lesson, while going through it, together. For questions I get correct, we’ll skip over, but any that have mistakes we will discuss why it’s wrong and I’ll try to find the correct answer with some hints

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Super! Thank you for this. :slight_smile:

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